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Random thoughts about sound and vision.

Paying Attention To The Man Behind The Curtain - the Cinefex Blog

When it comes to the art of movie visual effects - or VFX - Cinefex has always been the essential guide.  

Since 1980, it has provided extensive behind-the-scenes VFX coverage - pulling back the curtain and throwing daylight upon screen magic. As well as covering the latest movie releases, Cinefex has also taken time out for in-depth retrospectives of landmark effects productions such as 2001 and CLOSE ENCOUNTERS. 

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In the thirty-plus years since the magazine's inception, the art of VFX has dramatically changed. These days, high-quality, seamless effects can be created on a laptop and on a budget -  Monsters (2010) being a prime example. Computer-generated imagery (or CGI) has revolutionised the industry and Cinefex has been there to provide exhaustive coverage of such game-changing films as YOUNG SHERLOCK HOLMES, JURASSIC PARK and THE MATRIX. Recently, Cinefex itself embraced the digital age, with the quarterly magazine now being available to read online and also in an enhanced version for the iPad.

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And in another bold step, they have introduced the Cinefex Blog. I'm particularly thrilled with this development, as a key contributor is author and friend, Graham Edwards. Graham earned his spurs through an exhaustive retrospective of the early editions of Cinefex on his own blog - from issue 1 (STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE and ALIEN) through issue 40 (GHOSTBUSTERS II and INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM). Graham has always had a deep appreciation of the craft of visual effects and in the Blog, he'll be filing regular updates as to what has caught his attention in the world of VFX. There's a useful email subscription service on the page too, which will alert you when a fresh article is posted.

As well as the Blog, Graham has written an upcoming article on the VFX of RUSH - Ron Howard's terrific film of the 1976 Formula One season rivalry between drivers James Hunt and Niki Lauda. This should prove to be a fascinating read, as the effects were subtly blended into the film, effortlessly recreating the high-speed duels fought on race circuits around the world. Graham's article is published in the next edition of Cinefex - number 136 - due in December.  

Exciting times ahead for both Cinefex and Graham - best wishes to both.